My first shooting match – MAWC

I played my first MAWC (in 10m Air Pistol) organised by the Maharashtra Rifle Association (MRA) this Saturday.

I learned shooting for 3 months last year. This June, I continued from where I had left.

As a novice, it was very difficult to find information about how to go about the match on the internet. Hence, I log my takeaways here for any shooter to find.

  1. The match is total 1.30 hrs, with sighting time. Make sure you reach at least an hour and a half beforehand.
  2. Take permissions for the smallest of things like changing cylinders. The range officers are very cooperative and will guide you throughout. However, this means that they will be strict too if you disobey the range/safety rules.
  3. Take care of hydration and make sure you eat before the match.
  4. It is totally easy to hit straight 10s if you calibrate your pistol right.
  5. Try to fill cylinders beforehand from the range you practice on, because there may or may not be availability of air pressure in the cylinders at the MRA.

If you have questions, please feel free to ask in the comments. Happy shooting!

Day 11 : Something that you always think “What if…” about

I haven’t had to think much about this. There are a very few events about which I think what if.

I was in school, probably not over 5th standard. My Grandpa used to drop me to school on our Kinetic Honda.

School always opened in the first week of June, which also marks (…err used to mark, now monsoon is too erratic) the beginning of monsoon. Because of the ‘kichad’ that covered the kaccha road to school up to 5-to-10 blocks, we had to park near another school and walk all the way to the gate.

Grandpa was so caring that he used to walk up to the school at leaving time. I never walked alone to the parked scooter. One such day, we were walking back from school and I noticed some puddles formed at the side of the road. I was tempted to step in them.

There was a big puddle, larger than the bucket-sized ones. I looked up at Grandpa and asked, “Should I jump in it?” He smiled and said, “Why not?”

We were some steps away from the puddle. I was wearing pristine white socks and jet black shoes (which weren’t that black anymore). A curious thought occurred to me. “What if Mom shouts that I got my socks dirty?”

Now that I look back, that thought seems to be triggered by Providence itself because I have never cared enough for Mom’s reprimands or the fact that she will have to wash soiled socks (yes, I feel bad). BUT, you get the point, right? That thought occurred to me, and half out of fear and half out of concern, I did not go through with my decision.

When we were about to reach the parked scooter, an acquaintance of Grandpa’s came up to him, they got talking and I was looking around me, utterly bored when only under a minute had passed. Suddenly my ears pricked at a sentence I heard – Only 3 days back, a child had fallen into one of the uncovered wells a few kms away. There is a growth in wells dug up and abandoned when they don’t hit water. People don’t build a boundary wall around them and unsuspecting children and animals fall in them. There’s one such well right behind you! See? Last week’s rains have filled it to the brim and now it looks like just another puddle…”

WHAAA? I stood with my mouth agape. My Grandpa finished the conversation and walked on as if nothing had happened. I looked up at him and asked, “What if I had jumped in the puddle, erm, well?” He smiled and said, “Nothing. I would have saved you.”

That was reassuring, as my Grandpa is a very skilled swimmer. But I still shudder at the thought of having put a foot in a puddle and stumbling into a well!

I know my writing style has deteriorated of late. Please bear.

Decoding writer’s block

When people ask me why don’t they see me blog these days, how is my novel coming along, how’s writing in general, sometimes I say it has taken a backseat and at other times – I have a writer’s block. In my context, writer’s block is not applicable at all, because, truth to be said – I don’t try to write these days.

Last year, when I left my day job, I had elaborate writing plans.

Why don’t I write and blame it on writer’s block :

  1. I keep avoiding writing because of procrastination.
  2. I do not have a writing time. I am thinking of starting regular writing in the morning hours.
  3. I set very high standards for myself. The result is, I keep churning more ordinary stuff. Though someone has rightly said, there is more extraordinary in the ordinary than the one trying to appear extraordinary. That someone is me. At least I agree with me on something.
  4. The more I read, the more I am convinced that I will never write an authentic draft.
  5. I don’t have a peer writer’s circle, so to speak. It is true that I follow wonderful bloggers who happen to be amazing writers, but I do not seek active feedback from them. Why? Because I DO NOT WRITE!
  6. I should stop thinking of writing as a task and write for the love of the written word.

I leave you with these incomplete thoughts…