Author Interview : J K Sachin of The PM’s Wishlist

16th May, a day when the destiny of the largest democracy will be sealed for the next 5 years. A major change in power is expected. What better a time to post the author interview of Mr J K Sachin! The man who dreamed of writing a political story of a dynamic PM and his wishlist and wrote it so wonderfully.

His latest offering, the PM’s wishlist is available on Kindle at Amazon.
I was interested in the book for 2 reasons :

1) I heard about it from Anita Menon, who I know has a penchant for dishing out (literally) and fishing out the most peculiar of stories.

2) I have a political plot of mine 😉 and I envy, admire and research all political fiction books I can find.

The book was a great read, albeit lengthy – but then it does get lengthy when one is trying to fit 5 years of a drastic image shift of a nation the size and stature of India.

Without much ado, ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, Mr J K Sachin.

You have desisted from describing the Prime Minister’s appearance, background (religious/educational/financial) and rise from the grassroot level. How did you picture him while writing? Did you see yourself in him?

I was sensitive to the fact that people had very fixed perceptions about who they would like to see as their PM. I did not want to take the uphill route of trying to replace the persona in people’s mind with a character from my imagination. I deliberately chose to avoid describing the PM. Fans of Mr. Modi, Mr Gandhi and Mr. Kejriwal or other leaders are free to imagine their leader as the PM in the book. Besides improving acceptability of the character, it makes people’s perceptions stronger. However I did not imagine myself at all. It would be too preposterous though I did have a fancy of becoming a PM in my schooling days.

Was the novel strategically released during the election frenzy? What was the total time you worked on the draft? How important is it to promote the book, after its release, according to you?

I had been working over weekends for almost two years but decided to pack the research into a book to coincide with elections. Promotion is important. A book is a product and like any product has to be marketed and promoted.

What is your take on the current Indian fiction scenario? Do you admire any of the current Indian authors? Can you please share their names and the reason for which you admire them?

I find the scene too fractured and no specific authors have the kind of brand recall in my mind unfortunately. I did like Ravi Subramaniam’s The Incredible Banker though.

Can you please give us a sneak-peek into the books that are in queue from your pen?

I am working on a book on Start-ups in India and on the Customer experience scene in India. I am not sure of the completion date since a lot of research is being compiled currently.

For whom should an author write – audience or himself? Today, everyone wants to be an author. I am not being judgmental, however one spots a truck-load of mushy campus stories and books that surround a one-line story when browsing book stores. What would you advise a first time author such that he is encouraged to write and still does not churn out a similar run-of-the-mill work?

An author should write a book if he sincerely and passionately believes that the book will inform, entertain or educate the reader and add value. It’s a responsibility when a reader picks your book because he or she expects you to make it worthwhile. If the book does not contribute to the thoughts, inform, make people pause and think or provoke an argument the author should not waste his or her time and that of his readers. I am not suggesting that every book needs to start a movement but if the author is not passionate about the need to share his or her thoughts with the audience for their benefit, not his, a book should not be attempted.

Thank you Mr Sachin for your valuable time, we are pleased to host you at Wordcoiner!